"

Respect ~ Responsibility ~ Personal Best

Geography 

What is geography?  Click on link to view Malcolm McInerney is Chairperson of the National Geography Teachers' Association (AGTA). He was one of the writers of the Shape of the Australian Curriculum: Geography. He speaks here about what Geography learning is for. Published on Oct 13, 2013

What is it for? Watch this animation

How do students learn Geography?  Students adopt the role of a geographer. The syllabus is structured so that student learning about geographical concepts as they learn to use the processes and skills used by a geographer in the real world. 

Stage statements

A progression of learning (Download here)

The Geography K-10 Syllabus describes a progression of learning. The stage statements describe the expected standard of achievement by the end of the stage. Each stage builds on the prior stage increasing in complexity and challenge. 

A developmental progression
 
By the end of Early Stage 1
students identify familiar places and recognise why some places are special or important to people and how they care for them. 

By the end of Stage 1
students describe the natural features of different places, including the weather and seasons, and recognise that places exist across a range of scales.

By the end of Stage 2
students examine the characteristics of places in different locations from the local to the national scale.


By the end of Stage 3

students describe the diverse characteristics of places in different locations across local and global scales. 



They recognise that places can be represented on maps.


 They describe human features of places, including how spaces can be arranged for different purposes. 

They describe interconnections between people and the environment. They identify simple patterns in the distribution of the features of places. 
They explain interactions between people, places and environments and identify factors influencing interconnections. 

 Students acquire information by observing, talking to others and viewing, reading and/or listening to texts.

Students investigate how places are managed and cared for and discuss the connections people have to different places. 

Students recognise the importance of the environment and examine how different perceptions influence people’s responses to a geographical challenge.

Students compare spatial distributions and patterns among phenomena. They explore how people respond to a geographical challenge and investigate reasons for differing perspectives.
Click to edit text
Students pose questions and collect and record information to answer these questions.



Students develop geographical questions to investigate and collect and record relevant data and information to answer these questions. 


 Students develop geographical questions to frame an inquiry. They use a variety of strategies to locate, collect and record relevant data and information to answer inquiry questions.

Click to edit text
They represent data in tables and on maps. They interpret geographical information to draw conclusions. 
 


 They represent data by constructing tables and graphs and maps featuring cartographic conventions. They read maps to determine location, direction and distance. Students interpret data and draw conclusions. 
They represent data in different forms. Students interpret data and other information to identify and compare spatial distributions, patterns and trends, infer relationships and draw conclusions.

They use geographical tools and communicate geographical information in a range of forms. 
They present findings in a range of communication forms using simple geographical terms. 
They present findings using geographical terminology in a range of communication forms. 
They present findings and ideas using geographical terminology in a range of communication forms. 
Students reflect on their learning from the findings of their inquiry.

  They reflect on their learning and suggest actions in response to the findings of their inquiry.
They reflect on their learning and propose individual action in response to a local geographical challenge and identify the expected effects of their proposed action.
They propose solutions, and may take action in response to a geographical challenge and describe the expected effects of their proposal.
 Assessment
 Assessment
 Assessment
 Assessment
 What will students do or produce to demonstrate understanding of key geographical concepts, skills and processes?
What will students do or produce to demonstrate understanding of key geographical concepts, skills and processes?

 What will students do or produce to demonstrate understanding of  key geographical concepts, skills and processes?

 What will students do or produce to demonstrate understanding of  key geographical concepts, skills and processes?

Outcomes

A student uses the skills, process and tools of geographical inquiry to acquire information to identify places and important places to people and communicates this geographical information through an appropriate mode.






Outcomes

A student uses the skills, process and tools of geographical inquiry 

to acquire information to identify 1-2 ways in which people interact with and care for places and describe features of places and the connections people have with places and communicates this geographical information through an appropriate mode. 




Outcomes
A student uses the skills, process and tools of geographical inquiry 
to acquire information to examine features and characteristics of places and environments, and to describe the ways people, places and environments interact and examine differing perceptions about the management of places and environments and communicates this geographical information through an appropriate mode. 

  Outcomes
A student uses the skills, process and tools of geographical inquiry 
to acquire information to describe the diverse features and characteristics of places and environments, explain interactions and connections between people, places and environments and compare and contrast influences on the management of places and environments and communicates this geographical information through an appropriate mode. 

GEe-1  concepts
 GE1-1 GE1-2  concepts
 GE2-1 GE2-2 GE2-3
 GE3-1 GE3-2 GE3-3 
 GEe-2 skills and processes
GE1-3 skills and processes
  GE2-4 skills and processes
  GE3-4 skills and processes

Backwards mapping from outcomes

Students engage with the content (knowledge, understanding and skills) of the process of geographical inquiry (see above).  To plan a sequence of learning start with the end in mind. Use the outcomes to design a summative task that will require students to learn new knowledge, understanding and skills to achieve. DOWNLOAD this template to assist you and remove the text as you respond to each section. Keep your unit short to begin with as you become familiar with the syllabus.

Differentiating learning

A conceptual approach to learning means that teachers can teach the same concept within and across stages. This provides the flexibility teachers need to respond to differentiate the learning program according to the

  • instructional needs of students (i.e. where they are now and where to next in learning)
  • interests of students 
  • learning profile, preferences, learning needs of students.

The conceptualskills, tools continuums allow teachers to be more precise in determining where students are now and where to next in their learning. Teachers can use the various continuums to increase or decrease the challenge of tasks according to the needs of their students. This approach supports a "growth' mindset where all students are expected to learn and all students experience progress in their learning and the achievement that comes with continuous progress. The stage statements,  outcomes and continuums provide the basis for assessment of, for and of learning. They provide a common language and framework for both professional dialogue and student goal setting and feedback

Designing units and sequences of learning 

Pre-prepared units of learning can be used as a starting point for planning a learning program responsive to the needs of the students in your learning context. To adapt these units be sure they are aligned with the appropriate BOSTES Geography outcomes. Check out this web site for more resources.